USA National Parks

Acadia National Park

Sand Beach

This Northern addition to the national parks was once the summer home to some of America's wealthiest citizens. Mt. Desert Island, Isle au Haut and the Schoodic Penninsula form this park. Its barren mountain tops and rocky coastline create a rugged and picturesque place not to be missed. Small fishing villages are nearby and then there is Bar Harbor for those that want a larger coastal town that has everything from art galleries to waterfront pubs. Many trails let you get away from the crowds while hiking. Roads are available to take you around the park as well as to the top of Cadillac Mountain. Extensive carriage roads are also found here for those who prefer walking, biking or horseback riding. Several campgrounds, trails for hiking, scenic loop trials, and beaches for swimming, can be found: Camping . The Schoodic Pennisula and Ilse au Haut are well served by Ferries . The sunsets from the vantage point of Cadillac Mountain are fantastic.

Biscayne National Park

Boca Chita Light

This addition to the national parks covers the northernmost islands of the Florida Keys, most of Biscayne Bay, and the northern section of the third largest coral reef in the world. It is home to mangrove forest and colorful tropical fish, manatees and sea turtles as well as dolphins. The most amazing fact is that 95 % of this park is under water. Shipwrecks are spread out on the reef. The mainland part of the park is home to the Visitor Center in Homestead, Florida. It is for sure mostly rural but very close to Miami's urban center. Biscayne Bay is the beginning and the end of the experience for most visitors who opt for a boat tour or exploration by private boat. Several campgrounds, trails for hiking, scenic loop trials, and beaches for swimming, can be found on the keys: Boca Chita Key and Elliott key are well served by tour operators. The sunsets over the mainland from the vantage point of the keys are fantastic.

Boston National Historical Park

This addition to the national parks covers one of the older cities in America Boston and the Boston Harbor Islands . It is for sure mostly an urban historical experience with the exception of the bucolic harbor islands. Boston is the beginning and the end of the Freedom Trail . The Trail winds its way among many historical buildings through downtown Boston and the Waterfront to the Navy Yard and its Ships. Several campgrounds, trails for hiking, scenic loop trials, and beaches for swimming, can be found on the harbor islands: Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area that are well served by Ferries. The sunsets over Boston from the vantage point of the islands are fantastic.

Cape Canaveral National Seashore

Navigate through Cape Canaveral National Seashore. This barrier island of sand reaches out into the Atlantic Ocean just North of the Kennedy Space Center NASA complex. It has extraordinary beaches to behold with dunes, turtles, birds, and alligators. The area also offers great viewing of space ship liftoffs and landings. Starting with the Apollo Beach at the Northern end of the Cape, to Playalinda Beach in the South, the Seashore is full of life in the sea and sky. The park shares its Southern end with the Merrit Island National Wildlife Refuge . You will always see a variety of birds and even alligators.

Cape Cod National Seashore

Navigate through Cape Cod National Seashore. This arm made of sand reaches out into the North Atlantic Ocean. It has extraordinary beaches to behold with dunes and birds galore. Starting with the Province Lands at the Northern Tip of the Cape, to Chatham in the South, the Seashore is full of life in the sea and sky. Whale watch tours are available as well as Charter boat fishing. When it comes to birds you will hear them even if can’t always see them.

Castillo de San Marcos National Monument

The Spanish military castle lying in the oldest European settled city in the United States (1565) became a National Monument in 1924 and part of the National Park Service in 1933. The Castle, or Castillo in Spanish, is in downtown St. Augustine, Florida. St. Augustine was for 235 years the capital of the Spanish Province of Florida. This old city still contins a great deal of Spanish architecture, from ancient stuctures to modern inspired buildings. The Castillo de San Marcos protects the waters of Matanzas Bay and the St. Augustine Inlet. Fort Matanzas, some 14 miles to the South, protected the area from a possible Southern attack. It is for sure mostly an urban historical experience with the exception of the bucolic beaches just to the East. Several campgrounds, trails for hiking, scenic loop trials, and beaches for swimming, can be found nearby: Anastasia Island State Park. The view from the St. Augustine lighthouse is the best vantage point for an overall view of the waterways in this fantastic and unique part of Florida.

Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve

The Chilkat River Valley is year round home to some 400 bald eagles and a stopover to thousands of migrating bald eagles each Fall. The warmer waters here do not freeze along with a great salmon population make this a great habitat for eagles. The Eagle Preserve protects the Eagle habitat in the Chilkat, Kleheni, and Tsirku Rivers and is a great viweing area. Nearby Haines is a small town with exceedingly beautiful scenery. This is "the Real Alaska". You've got your bears, bearded men, magnificent mountains, an award winning library, Native Cultural Center and Bald Eagle Visitor's Center. This compact town has a bit of everything from quaint shops to cafes.

Crater Lake National Park

Pronghorn

Crater Lake National Park is unique in that it emcompasses a vast terrain and includes what remains of a 12,000 foot volcanic peak that collasped onto itself after a massive eruption forming Crater Lake. What remain is a rim of peaks and cliffs surrounding the Lake at 6,173 feet. The Lake is fed only by rain and snowmelt such that its purity and clarity are unsurpassed. The height of the lake self regulates through a mysterious natural overflow valve like a bathtub. To the North of the Lake is the Pumice Desert. The 200 foot layer of pumice, a porous rock so light that it can float in water, does not support life. This Park is impressive. First it contains the fourteen mountains in various forms like cones, peaks and craters. Together they form part of the Cascade MountainCascade range. This Park is surrounded by four National Forests and one Wilderness. There are numerable mountain streams to behold, and several creek canyons with pinnacles. This immense area of approximately 286 square miles has front country trails and camping as well as backcountry trails and camping. Wildlife roam at ease here in old growth forest of towering ponderosa pines to ancient whitebark pines. A wide array of wildlife, including black bears, mountain lions, elk, black tail deer, pronghorn, spotted owls, and pika are found here.

towering ponderosa pines to ancient whitebark pines. These trees shelter a wide array of wildlife, including black bears, mountain lions, elk, and spotted owls.

Cumberland Island National Seashore

Sea Camp Live Oak

Navigate through Cumberland Island National Seashore only acessible by sea. This barrier island made of sand reaches out into the Atlantic Ocean just North of the St. Mary's River. It has extraordinary beaches to behold with dunes, wild horses , armadillos and birds galore. Starting with the ruins of the mansion and seemingly endless beaches at the Southern Tip of the Island, to the more heavily forested North, the Seashore is full of life everywhere you look from on land and in the sea and sky. You cannot miss the wild horses as they they own the Island and have free rein of its beaches, trails and roads. When it comes to birds you will hear them even if can’t always see them.

Denali National Park

Denali National Park... This Park is awesome. First it contains the highest mountain in North America 20,310 feet . It certainly is the High one. It is also a portion of the Alaska Range of mountains. There are innumerable glaciers to behold, as well as rivers and lakes. This immense area of approximately 6 million acres has very few trails and one main roadway (92 miles) with limited access. The trails start near the Denali Visitors Center at the entrance to the Park. The Park is all about Backcountry Wilderness camping or better known as backpacking. There are many backcountry National Park Rangers to keep an eye on the Park and its visitors. Official campgrounds exist along the central park access road and at the entrance. Wildlife roam at ease here including eagles, dall sheep, wolves and Grizzly bears .

Dry Tortugas National Park

Dry Tortugas

The Dry Tortugas are remote coral reefs and islands centered at Garden Key. The site had military significance up through the 19th Century and the United States built its largest fortress there: Fort Jefferson was designed with major gun implacements commanding access to the shipping lanes into the Gulf of Mexico. When fully operational the sparcity of water was solved by giant cisterns. When they failed over time a thermal desalination plant was built. Today you will have to bring in your own water. The 100 square miles of coral reefs and small islands (or keys) are home to much marine life including tropical fish and Loggerhead Sea Turtles. Many shipwreaks are found here making it interesting for both diving and snorkeling. 300 species of birds, patricularly various terns, boobies, frigatebirds, owls and migratory species nest here. The Park is all about reefs and wonderfully clear blue water. Primitive sites, better known as tent camping sites, are found just outsite of Fort Jefferson at Garden Key. You will find great beaches and snorkeling nearby.

Everglades National Park

Everglades

The Everglades are huge. First they contain forest and fauna not seen anywhere else in the United States. Over 125 varieties of tropical trees are found here including Mangroves, Mahoghany, Inkwood, Mastic, Strangler Fig, Wild Tamarind, Ironwood, Blolly, Gumbo Limbo, Soldierwood, Cockspur, Slash Pine and Royal Palm. It contains Florida Panthers, Crocodiles, Alligators, Manatees, Dolphins, Loggerhead Turtles, Conch, Herons, Egrets, Ibises, Spoonbill, Storks and even Flying Fish among others. The Park is all about backcountry wilderness camping, better known as canoe camping (sites are also accessible by kayak or powerboat). There are backcountry National Park Rangers to keep an eye on the Park and its visitors. Official campgrounds exist for both tents and RV's with access from the Homestead Entrance: Long Pine Key Campground and Flamingo Campground. Ranger led trips are available. Avoid the summer rainy season popular with mosquitoes.

Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park... It all begins in with the ferry access to Bartlett Cove. The Park is regularly serviced by the Alaska Marine Highway System from Juneau. Gustavus, Alaska is the nearest Town some 9 miles away. The Park is significant for its main attaction, a 65 mile long fiord with several glaciers and spectacular mountains. The Bay and its many inlets are frequented by whales, sea lions, seals, sea otters, and dolphins. The shore is inhabited by moose, mountain goat as well as black and brown bears. Take note that this is the largest National Park in the United States.

Glacier National Park

Glacier / Fox /

Glacier National Park (Montana, USA) is a great destination and an international adventure trip if you include Waterton Lakes National Park (Canada) immediately to its North. This park combination will take several days to visit and consists of mountain wilderness, amazing pristine lakes, and rivers. Access is mainly by car with the exception of the Amtrak trains coming to Glacier National Park (USA) with stops in East Glacier, Essex and West Glacier with nearby hotels. Whitefish is a great portal using Glacier International Airport as well as Amtrak. The beauty of Glacier is on the Going to the Sun Highway and in Many Glacier. The Park is home to numerous birds as well as a great fish habitat. Both grizzly and black bears are found here as well as wolves, coyotes, wolverines, mountain goats, mule deer, white-tailed deer, bighorn sheep, cougars, bobcats, Canadian lynxes, river otters, beavers, moose, elk, bald eagles, pika, hoary marmots, foxes, and snowshoe hares. This abundant wildlife lives on both slopes of the Continental Divide.

Grand Canyon National Park

Grand Canyon National Park

Considered one of the seven wonders of the natural world, this northern Arizona location is much more than a picturesque valley through which flows the Colorado River one mile below the Rim. The Canyon is 277 miles of river within almost 2000 square miles of wilderness.

Many places are prettier in the pictures. The Grand Canyon is a notable exception. The place is completely incredible! By far the most thrillingly beautiful thing I have ever seen. At every time of day the sun kisses the rocks to reveal new colors and shapes. It's just something you really have to see for yourself...

To delve deeper into the canyon, you can take a guided tour atop a mule. Or go by foot. Just remember: WATER!! It gets hot in there and many have died. Prepare!! It also is super important to make lodging reservations if going to the South Rim as nearly 90% of the visitors do. The North Rim is one thousand feet higher than the South Rim and still has the incredibly colorful rock layers that are millions of years old.

https://www.grandcanyonlodges.com/lodging/

Grand Teton National Park

The Grand Teton National Park is immediately South of Yellowstone National Park. It is significantly different from Yellowstone because of its vast open areas and the mountain that it's named after. It is located on the Continental Divide and resides in Wyoming to the North of Jackson Hole . The Snake River flows through the park and several lakes are here as well. This iconic Teton mountain range is less developed than its northern neighbor. Buffalo and Elk roam the range here. Black and Grizzly bears are seen. Moose, mule deer, wolves and mountain lions are in the park as well. Hiking oportunities abound in and around the Mountain Range. Boating opportunities are available in the Lakes and Rivers. The main lake is Jackson Lake and various campgrounds, lodges and marinas are available.

Hawaii

Hawaii's Parks and Mounuments are spread among the various islands that form the State of Hawaii. The Offerings focus on History and Volcanoes. The most visited site has been the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument at Pearl Harbor on the Island of Oahu. The island is also famous as the State Capital as well as the traditional capital of the Kingdom of Hawaii (Oahu has the only Royal Palace in the United States).

Maui is home to the Haleakala National Park protecting volcanic landscapes and sub-tropical rain forest Hawaiian cultural sites.

The big island of Hawaii is home to the largest of the Hawaiian Parks: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This Park covers the Mauna Loa (13,677 feet) and Kilauea (4000 feet) volcanoes. Both volcanoes are considered active and Kilaue has been erupting since 1983. Lava meets the sea and the island of Hawaii grows continuously. The island landscape changes every day and the Park adjusts accordingly.

Katahdin Woods and Waters National Mounument

This recent addition to the National Parks borders Baxter State Park and the Appalachian Mountain range . It is still being developed. Mount Katahdin is the end of the Appalachian Trail . The International Appalachian Trail starts here and proceeds to Canada and the tip of the Gaspe Peninsula at Forillion National Park. The Park does have several camping areas, trails for hiking, a scenic loop road, and the East branch of the Penobscot River for kayaking and canoeing .

https://baxterstatepark.org

Kings Canyon & Sequoia National Parks

Kings Canyon National Park is contiguous with Sequoia National Park in the Sierra High Nevada Mountains of California. Together they encompass 1300 square miles with over 90% wilderness country. The mountain range here is unsurpassed anywhere outside of Alaska: Mount Whitney rises 14,494 feet. There are over 826 miles of hiking trails here including the Pacific Crest Trail, the High Sierra trail and the John Muir trail. Several rivers flow through magnificent canyons including Kings Canyon and Kern's Canyon. This magestic park is seen by most visitors with a visit through the entrance at Kings Canyon Visitor Center, or the Foothills Visitor Center at Sequoia National Park. The trees found here are the largest trees by volume on Earth. One such sequoia tree measures about 270 feet in height and has a circumference of 107.5 feet at its base. Over thirty groves contains giant Sequoia trees in both parks. Large granite formations form mountaintops. There are multiple mountains in excess of 12,000 feet. This was one the nation's first national parks . It contains multiple raging rivers and waterfalls. Hiking oportunities abound in and around the park. Wildlife includes bighorn sheep, bobcats, coyotes, mule deer, black bears and especially pika.

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

Skagway

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park... It all begins in Skagway, Alaska . This beautiful port is at the northern end of the Inside Passage. This park is special in that it memorializes the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 19th century. Gold had been found in a tributary of the Klondike River in Canada's Yukon Territory (more gold was later discovered in Alaska). Thousands of gold seekers came up from western United States ports by ship to find their fortunes. Skagway is situated near two mountain passes that lead over the almost impenetreble coastal mountain range that separates southeast Alaska from Canada. Over the ridge is the Yukon River that flows Northwest to the gold fields and central Alaska . The National Park makes up a majority of the routes to the two mountain passes: The White Pass Trail and the Chilkoot Trail . Many historic buildings in Skagway are part of the National Park. It is distinctive for its mountains and several lakes. The town that has it all – touristy but also quaint. Many good restaurants are here, motels, hotels, museums, art galleries, bookstores, various markets and funky bars. There are campsites available as well. Skagway remains the starting point of a major route into central Alaska by way of Bennett, Dawson, Whitehorse and Fairbanks . Take note that you are leaving the United States for awhile and entering British Columbia and the Yukon both of which are in Canada. Parks Canada has its own Klondike National Historic Sites. Many take this route to reach Denali National Park.

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Pika

Lassen Volcanic National Monument

Lassen Peak is 10,457 feet of maginificent mountain and dormant volcano but it is only part of the rim of a once giant volcano. Fifteen other peaks are also part of this Park. This is Northen California's volcanic kingdom. It is the beginning of the Cascade Mountains that extend North to the Canadian border. It is home to crystal-clear mountain lakes and wildflower meadows in summer. The land is alive with activity here from bubbling caldrons of mud to steam vents and hot springs. Atsugewi, Yana, Yahi, and Maidu Native Tribes lived here in the summer months for hunting and gathering. Because of its weather and snow conditions, generally high elevation, and seasonally mobile deer populations, the Lassen area was not conducive to year-round living. The Natives also knew that the area peaks were full of fire and water and thought they would one day blow themselves apart (They were correct of course). Today seismic and volcanic activity is closely monitored. Wildlife residents include black bear, bobcat, mountain lion, raccoon, coyote, mountain red fox, weasel, pika, skunk, marten and ringtail.

Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

Located in Vermont's Green Mountains, and next to the Appalachian Trail, Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park is a cultural and scenic gem in Woodstock, Vermont. Main access is by car just off of Route 4 and the center of town. The Park encompasses the Marsh, Billings and Rockefeller family land. The family heritage on environmental conservation and the backing and creation of national parks in various parts of the United States is extensive. Here in Vermont the family management of farm and forest is demonstrated in managed woodland, sustainable farming and recreation in the Mt. Tom area. There are hiking trails in field and forest. Just outside the park is the Billings Farm. This is a museum and working dairy farm open to visitors. The nearby Appalachian Trail is a 2180 mile long hiking trail, along the Appalachian mountains from Georgia to Vermont, that is partially managed by the National Park Service.

Mendenhall Glacier

Set course for Alaska's Capital city deep within the Tongass National Forest . The Tongass is the largest temperate rainforest in the world. Be prepared for a wet experience but enjoy the lush vegetation and the towering Peaks in this Pacific Northwest coastal zone. Although it's the second-largest city in Alaska, Juneau is surprisingly cozy! There are lots of lovely places to stay, cute shops to peruse, and artsy cafes to dream in. Cruise ships come right downtown. Mendenhall Glacier is the gem in this region showing us the grandeur of this massive glacier that is ever so slowly flowing into Medenhall Lake which spills into the sea.

Mt. Hood National Forest

Mt. Hood National Forest

Mt. Hood is 11,239 feet of maginificent mountain and dormant volcano . This is Oregon's highest peak. The Forest consists of some 1,067,043 acres. While not exactly a National Park (it is still in process), the Mt. Hood region includes 8 National Wilderness areas and the National Historic Landmark of Timberline Lodge. It begins only 20 miles from Portland, Oregon and is easily seen from the city. The Forest begins at the Columbia River Gorge to the North and stretches some 60 miles to the South. It has many recreational opportunities including year-round skiing from Timberline , mountain climbing, extensive hiking, swimming, fishing, mountain biking, rafting, horseback riding and hunting. It contains several rivers and many lakes.

Mt. Rainier National Park

Mt. Rainier is Washington's highest mountain at 14,410 feet and an active volcano . This iconic mountain is only 54 miles southeast of Seattle and viewable from great distances. It has the most glaciers of any Mountain peak south of Alaska. It is the source of six major rivers. It is also one of the most beautiful sites to visit from its extensive forests to its flowering alpine meadows . Climbing requires technical expertise and is challanging. Hiking oportunities abound in and around the Mountain.

Northern Cascades National Park

Northern Cascades National Park encompasses many of Washington's high mountains: McGregor (8,122 ft.); Goode (9,220 ft.); Logan (9087 ft.); Arriva (8,215 ft.); Boston (8,894 ft.); Eldorado (8868 ft.); Snowfield (8347 ft.); Colonial (7,771 ft.) Ruby (7,408 ft.); Triumph (7271 ft.); Bacon (7061 ft.); Despair (7292 ft.); Fury (8291 ft.); Challenger (8,207 ft.); Prophet (7640 ft.); Whatcom (7574 ft.); Shuksan (9,131 ft.); Copper (7142 ft.); and, Redoubt (8969 ft.); and the Pacific Crest Trail that runs through them. . These incredible mountains have been referred to as the American Alps. These mountains seem impenetreble but several passes allow passage from West to East (or East to West): Whatcom Pass in the North, and Washington Pass and Cascade Pass in the South. The Park is 110 miles Northeast of Seattle and is viewable from great distances (such as Puget Sound). It has the most glaciers of the lower 48 States. The Park contains more than 2 million acres of wilderness and two large lakes: Ross Lake (23 miles long); Diablo Lake (7.5 miles long); and Lake Chelan (50.5 miles long). Lake Chelan, although the most developed, is also one of the most beautiful sites to visit. As you cruise up the Lake from Chelan take in the towering mountain peaks in view and the extensive forests. Hiking trails at Stehekin range from easy to challenging. Hiking oportunities abound when travelling the North Cascades scenic Highway (Route 20). Other worthwhile hiking is available from the Cascade River Road.

Statue of Liberty National Mounument

This park in the middle of New York Harbor is made up of Liberty Island and Ellis Island. The Statue of Liberty is on Liberty Island and the National Museum of Immigration is on Ellis Island in the former Federal Immigration Station. The National Park Service has been caring for the Statue of Liberty since 1933 and for Ellis Island since 1990. These two islands are in close proximity to the largest city in the United States with a population well over 8 million people.

The Islands are only accessed by boat from either Battery Park in New York City or Liberty State Park in New Jersey. The Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island Ferry is has exclusive access. Keep in mind that there are many more people using the NYC portal. To avoid the crowds, it is very easy to take the Liberty Landing Ferry from Warren Street in front of the World Trade Center to Liberty Landing and then take the Statue of liberty / Ellis Island ferry. Views of the New York City skyline are incredible from here. Be sure to reserve your tickets and desired access level or tour from the Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island Ferry.

Olympic National Park

Mt. Olympus is highest mountain of the Olympic Peninsula at 7,980 feet and part of a range of mountains that form the backbone of this incredible wilderness area in Northwestern Washington. The Olympic National Park is an impressive mixture of ecosystems from its long Pacific coastal regions to rain forest to alpine meadows and glaciers. This Park has them all in a compact geographical area. The Park Headquarters Visitor Center is about 2 1/2 hours by car and ferry. There are 16 drive in campgrounds and multiple varities of lodging around the Park. Several pristine lakes as well as rivers and streams are found here. The rain forest areas contain enormous douglas fir and western red cedar. Hiking opportunities abound in and around the mountains as well as along the beach and coastal sections.

National Capital Parks : Washington, DC

Washington's Parks and Mounuments and Museums are first rate. The National Capital has much to offer as the seat of Government of the United States. From the White House to the Capital and the Supreme Court oppurtunities abound for viewing if not visiting. The National Mall is flanked by 11 museums and galleries and a nearby Zoo all part of the Smithsonian. This is a great city for walking but there is as an impressive Metro (subway) providing efficient transport across the city.

National Capital Parks

Yellowstone National Park

Mule deer

Yellowstone was the nation's first national park . It is located on the Continental Divide and resides in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming and covers 3000 square miles. It is contiguous with the Grand Teton National Park. It contains the grand canyon of the Yellowstone River. Hot Springs and Geysers abound especially near Old Faithful Lodge . Hiking oportunities abound in and around the park. Wildlife abound including bighorn sheep, bison, elk, moose, mountain goats, mule deer, pronghorn, and white-tailed deer, black bears, Canada lynx, coyotes, grizzly bears, mountain lions, wolverines, and wolves. There are lakes and rivers to enjoy.

Yosemite National Park

Yosemite is 1500 square miles of wilderness beauty preserved in the High Sierra Mountains of California. This magestic park is seen by most visitors with a visit to Yosemite Valley but there is so much more. Giant granite formations abound. EL Capitan is famous with rock climbers. The Wawona area contains giant Sequoia trees some as lage as 200 feet tall and nearly 100 feet in circumference. There are multiple mountains in excess of 9,000 feet. This was one the nation's first national parks . It contains multiple waterfalls and two main rivers: the Merced and the Tuolumne. Hiking oportunities abound in and around the park. Wildlife abound including bighorn sheep, bobcats, coyotes, mule deer and especially black bears.

More USA National Parks

Canada National Parks

Banff National Park

Black Bear Cubs

Banff was Canada's first national park . It is located on the Continental Divide and resides in Alberta, covering 6000 square kilometres. It is contiguous with Jasper National Park to the North, and Yoho National Park as well as Kootenay National Park to the West. It contains the core of the Rocky Mountains and numerous glaciers. Hot Springs are found especially near Banff . Hiking oportunities abound in and around the park. Wildlife are numerous including bighorn sheep, bison, elk, moose, mountain goats, mule deer, woodland caribou, red fox, cougars, white-tailed deer, black bears, Canada lynx, coyotes, grizzly bears, mountain lions, wolverines, and wolves. There are lakes and rivers to enjoy.

Forillion Parks Canada

Cap-des-Rosiers

Navigate through Forillon National Park. Forillon is at the end of the Appalachian Mountains where they boldly end in the Gulf of St. Lawrence . It is rich in forests and sea. There is abundant wildlife in both: (1) from moose, bears to even porcupines on land; and, (2) whales, dolphins, seals, and many fish in the seas. Overhead you will find herons and gannets among many others. The Park has several campgrounds. The Petit Gaspe Campground has the most to offer in terms of facilities (bathrooms with hot showers, restaurant, stores, a pool and climbing structures) and sites for all types of camping. It also has excellent access to hiking trails.

Fundy Parks Canada

Pointe Wolfe

Navigate through Fundy National Park. Come and visit this mountainous coastline with the world’s highest tides in the Province of New Brunswick and the Bay of Fundy . Explore the ocean floor during low tide and the amazing rocks. Hiking trails abound in the Acadian wilderness (a mixture of coniferous and evergreen forest). The scenery is amazing from the quaint fishing village of Alma nearby to excellent Park campgrounds both at elevation and near the shore. Access is by car via Route 114. Nearby is a must see Hopewell Rocks.

Glacier National Park

Mountain view

Glacier National Park is much more than a drive through area on the Trans-Canada Highway. This park consists of alpine mountain wilderness and glaciers leading to the pristine headwaters of the Columbia River. Access is mainly by car with the exception of the trains coming to tour the Canadian Rockies. The area is spectacular by itself but is a portal to cross through jagged mountains. The several campgrounds are near streams and huge old growth trees. Wildlife here includes grizzly and black bears, goat, sheet, deer, moose, wolf, cougar lynx, elk, coyote, and even wolverine. This is a place to hike up to a glacier or stand in awe of the shear rock walls that encompass the sky.

Jasper National Park

The Jasper National Park is immediately North of Banff National Park. It is significantly larger at 11,000 square kilometres and is like Banff's big brother. It is located on the Continental Divide and resides in Alberta with the major Western village of Jasper to the North of Banff via the Icefields Parkway: Route 93N. Nine rivers flow through the park and several lakes are here as well. The largest lake in the Rockies is here: Maligne Lake with its outflow through the Maligne Canyon. The Rocky Mountain range here is less developed than its Southern neighbor. Buffalo and Elk roam the range here. Black and Grizzly bears are seen. Moose, mule deer, wolves and mountain lions are in the park as well. Hiking oportunities abound in and around the Mountain Range. Boating opportunities are available in the lakes and rivers. Various campgrounds and lodges are available even in the Winter. Winter activities include alpine skiing at Marmot Basin , nordic skiing, skating, snowshoeing and fat biking. Backcountry hiking and horseback wilderness adventures are well developed here.

Klondike National Historic Sites Parks Canada

Skagway Pier

Navigate through Klondike National Historic Sites in Yukon. This is a series of sites all related to the Klondike Gold Rush. The focus is on the Route to get there and originates in Skagway, Alaska . It includes the Chilcoot Trail National Historic Site in British Columbia and the Klondike National Historic Sites in Dawson and Whitehorse, Yukon .

Access: Via Skagway by Alaska Marine Highway System and many cruise ships . Once in Skagway you can proceed via the Klondike highway over the mountains to Whitehorse by car. Road connections can be made to continue on toward Anchorage or to the lower 48 States via the Alaska-Canadian Highway . Alternative travel includes rail/bus via the White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad in Skagway with connections to Whitehorse, Yukon and Fraser, British Columbia.

Kootenay National Park

Kootenay / water view /

Kootenay Campgrounds

Kootenay National Park is a must see area and well worth a visit of several days. This park consists of mountain wilderness, amazing lakes and incredible hot springs. Access is by car with the exception of the buses coming to tour the Canadian Rockies. The area is spectacular by itself but is a highway portal to Banff on a major north-south Canadian route. Highlights are Floe Lake , Boom Lake , Sinclair Canyon and Radium Hot Springs . The several rivers in Kootenay National Park are really scenic and home to many birds as well as a great fish habitat. Both grizzly and black bears are found here as well as goat, sheet, deer, moose, wolf, cougar lynx, elk, coyote, and even wolverine. This abundant wildlife lives on the Western slopes of the Continental Divide.

Parks Canada Lachine Canal: Montreal

Montreal

Canada's second largest city, and its largest French speaking city, is well worth a visit of several days. It is named after Mt. Royal the highest point on the Island of Montreal. Mt. Royal is also a natural oasis in the center of the city complete with many hiking and biking trails as well as a man made lake. This city is quite accessible by land, sea, or air. The "sea" part is due to the being at the confluence of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence rivers. It is not that unusal to see Ships and private boats that have come upstream from the Atlantic here. Montreal has a modern airport. It also has excellent bus and train service. It all begins with the waterfront and the Old Port . This is a major seaport in the heart of French Canada welcoming many Cruise ships. If you have come by boat (everything from a canoe to a yacht) you can come to the center of Montreeal via the Lachine Canal itself a National Historic site that is a 14 kilometres waterway that takes you to the heart of Montreal’s must-see attractions, with beatiful scenery. It canal has five locks. Each lock station is maned by Parks Canada Staff. The Lachine Canal is really a scenic waterway connecting the Old Port of Montreal with Old Lachine on lake St. Louis. Parks abound the length of the canal with the most green space on the Old Lachine end. It is also the location of the not to be missed The Fur Trade at Lachine National Historic Site. A venerable old stone warehouse built in 1803 displays the Golden Age of 19th century fur trade. This extensive exhibition tells the story of trappers, voyageurs, Amerindians and bourgeois of the time.

Prince Edward Island Parks Canada

Victoria Light

Navigate through Prince Edward Island National Park. This is a different type of Park even for Canada. There are two main locations both on the North Shore: Cavendish and Brackley-Dalvay. Both have beautiful beaches, campgrounds, beach facilities and red stone cliffs. Cavendish is unusual for its white sand beaches.

Access: Via car on Route 6 in Cavendish, P.E.I. Prince Edward Island is accessed by an 8 mile long bridge across Northumberland Strait to the West and by a Ferry to the East. Be prepared for a largely agricultural landscape as you cross vast potato farmland in the interior. The quaint fishing villages that dot the coast are worth a stopover. (I highly recommend the village of Victoria .)

Quebec Parks Canada

Quebec

Quebec National Historic Site The Quebec National Historic sites are mainly in the center of the old city. It all starts at the Frontenac Kiosk on the Dufferin Terrace . There are various attractions in this fabled walled city . Do not miss the Citadel. The Fortifications tour guided by a Parks Canada ranger is a top attraction. There are also self guide tours. Please include the St-Louis Forts and Chateau within your visit.

This provincial capital is the crown jewel of the French and British regimes in the area. Built atop Cap Diamant , a ridge and the Plains of Abraham at an imposing height from the St. Lawrence River . The City includes both the upper walled city and the lower town by the River. The city was founded by the French in 1608 and its many old homes and narrow cobble-stoned streets remain. This is a UNESCO World Heritage Site . It is now also a thriving city that has moved well outside the old walls.

Revelstoke National Park

Revelstoke is located on the Trans-Canada Highway adjacent to the Town of Revelstoke and the Columbia River on its Western edge. It also emcompasses Mount Revelstoke a magnificent mountain with a special access road: Meadows in the Sky Parkway allowing travel by car to the summit and wildflower meadows in July and August. It is located in the Selkirk Mountains immediately noth of Mount McKenzie and is sprawling ski resort. It is only 16 kilometers West of Glacier National Park. Hiking oportunities abound in and around the park. Wildlife are numerous including moose, mule deer, mountain caribou, mountain goat, pine marten, black bears, Canada lynx, coyotes, grizzly bears, coyote and wolverine. There are glacial lakes and incredible river views to enjoy.

Rideau Canal National Historic Site : Ottawa-Kingston

Ottawa Parliament

Kingston

Ottawa , Canada's Capital city, is well worth a visit of several days. This city is quite accessible by land, sea, or air. The "sea" part is due to the being at the confluence of the Ottawa and Rideau rivers. It is not that unusal to see private boats that have come upstream from the Atlantic here. Ottawa has a modern airport. It also has excellent bus and train service. It all begins with Pariament Hill and the Parliament Buildings . To tour the City of Ottawa and the region go to the govenrment tourist office. If you have come by boat (everything from a canoe to a large yacht) you can come to the center of Ottawa via the Rideau Canal itself a National Historic site that is some 126 miles long with 45 locks and 24 lock stations. Each lock station (with the exception of downtown Ottawa and Smith Falls) accepts campers and boaters alike . The Carlton University setting in Ottawa is particularly attactive due to its location and access to the bike paths, the Dominion Arboretum, the Ornamental Gardens , and the Canadian Agricultural and Food Museum nearby. The Rideau Canal is really a scenic waterway connecting Kingston on lake Ontario to Ottawa and the Ottawa River.

Thousand Islands National Park

Canada's Thousand Islands National Park , is well worth a visit of several days. This park consists of undeveloped islands in the pristine headwaters of the St. Lawrence River. Access is mainly by boat with the exception of the main visitor center at Mallorytown Landing. If you have come by boat (everything from a canoe to a large yacht) you can come to each of the islands and find docking or mooring facilities. Camping is available on most islands. Reservations can be made via the Parks Canada site. The St. Lawrence River is really a scenic waterway and home to many birds as well as a great fish habitat. The River connects Lake Ontario to the Gulf of St. Lawrence and is the only outlet for the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. It forms part of the St. Lawrence Seaway allowing large ships to pass from the Atlantic Ocean to Lake Superior as far West as Duluth, Minnesota. In the region of the Thousand Islands the River is also an international boundary that separates Canada from the United States. Visitors crossing the border must report to United States Customs or to Canadian Customs. This is usually completed with a phone call from designated reporting stations. A United States station is located at Clayton, New York and a Canadian Station at Gananoque, Ontario.

Waterton Lakes National Park

Waterton Lakes / Fox /

Waterton Lakes National Park is a great destination and a phenominal adventure trip if you inclde Glacier National Park (USA) immediately to its South. This park combination will take several days to visit and consists of mountain wilderness, amazing pristine lakes. Access is mainly by car with the exception of the trains coming to Glacier National Park (USA) nearby here in the Rockies. The many lakes (80) and the Waterton River in the Park are home to numerous birds as well as a great fish habitat. Both grizzly and black bears are found here as well as wolves, coyotes, wolverines, mountain goats, mule deer, white-tailed deer, bighorn sheep, cougars, bobcats, Canadian lynxes, river otters, beavers, moose, elk, bald eagles, pika, hoary marmots, foxes, and snowshoe hares. This abundant wildlife lives on both slopes of the Continental Divide.

Yoho National Park

Yoho / view /

Yoho Campgrounds

Yoho National Park is a must see area and well worth a visit of several days. This park consists of mountain wilderness, amazing lakes and pristine headwaters of the Yoho River. Access is mainly by car with the exception of the trains coming to tour the Canadian Rockies. The area is spectacular by itself but is a portal to Banff as well as a major east-west Canadian route for both trains and motor vehicles. The several rivers in Yoho National Park are really scenic and home to many birds as well as a great fish habitat. Both grizzly and black bears are found here as well as goat, sheet, deer, moose, wolf, cougar lynx, elk, coyote, and even wolverine. This abundant wildlife lives on the Western slopes of the Continental Divide.

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